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My Teaching Philosophy

I started my teaching career 3 years ago as a Teaching Associate for Cal State Fullerton. At the end of my studies for graduate school, I completed a practicum which required me to compile a teaching portfolio, including a teaching philosophy.

By plucking her petals, you do not gather the beauty of the flower.”

-Rabindranath Tagore

Through my teaching of English and critical thinking, I want students to engage in society in every aspect of life through claiming their voices and not abdicating their personal power. Through a Socratic, communicative method of questioning students’ beliefs about authority and the right to speak (Peirce), professors and students can co-create knowledge and process in the classroom (Freire).

Through the MS TESOL program, I have gained much experience from my practicum teaching experience as an English 101 instructor, as well as my tutoring experiences at Coastline Community College’s Success Center and the CSUF Writing Center. In each of these positions, I have learned and applied the theories from Bonny Norton Peirce to Paolo Freire that I learned in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching Adults in an ESL/EFL Context. I also have modeled much of my syllabus after Ferris and Hedgecock’s recommendations.

Students are regularly subjected to the whims of teachers and other authority figures; their student knowledge and experience valid only if validated by authority. Paolo Freire’s banking concept of education applies quite well to today’s education system. In this philosophy, teachers give the gift of knowledge to eager students. Students lack knowledge, therefore they sit in class in order to absorb the knowledge that the all-knowing teacher bestows upon them. But this philosophy ignores the basic humanity of students: no one enters the classroom tabula rasa.

A new metaphor, rather than the negative, capitalistic definition of banking, is more apt to describe the classroom I strive for: a garden. The professor should act as a gardener, working with the natural inclinations of students for them to flourish. It is vital to consider students’ interests as “any gardener who should attempt to raise healthy, beautiful, and fruitful plants by outraging all those plants’ instinctive wants and searchings, would meet as his reward—sickly plants, ugly plants, sterile plants, dead plants” (de Cleyre). Ignoring that students bring their experiences and personal knowledge into the classroom is misguided. It is also important to give students the chance to grow in autonomy or “beauty” rather than “plucking away” at them so that they can fit into our educational molds. It is easy as teachers to engage with students on a purely transactional level rather than a human one. Each class brings different ethnicities, age groups, and social classes teaching the professor much about the world outside the classroom. Nothing happens in a vacuum.

Professors should act to encourage students to share their knowledge in the classroom and critically evaluate it. Critical thinking skills are integral parts of any English class. In doing so, the professor helps the student to become a critical thinker as well as a co-creator of knowledge. We learn how to interact with the discourse in society through our classrooms and our professors. Giving students the tools to go out and engage with society facilitates not only great English skills, but also social change. As a professor, I want to encourage my students to dissent and look for solutions if they see ills in society.

I wrote this two years ago for my practicum. Since then, I feel like I have lived many life times. However, the foundations of my teaching philosophy are still present in my mindset today. The garden metaphor is apt to describe the classroom, in more ways than one: a gardener can only control so much, plants thrive best in different environments and conditions, some plants need more or special attention from the gardener.

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Marissa’s Top Art Museums – The Uffizi

I recently recommended places to visit in Florence and Rome to my future sister-in-law and I figured it would make a great blog post as well about people interested in visiting those locations.

Art Museums

Gli Uffizi


Before we even get to the collection itself: the whole building is itself a masterpiece of architecture.

History | The Uffizi

Commissioned by Cosimo I de’ Medici, first Grand Duke of Tuscany, the building, was conceived to house the “Uffizi”, the administrative and legal offices of Florence. The work was entrusted to artist Giorgio Vasari, who designed an edifice with a Doric column portico, in a style that was both elegant and severe, established “upon the river and almost in the air”. – Le Gallerie degli Uffizi website

Gli Uffizi is home to many famous historical art pieces and is the number one priority destination for any art lover or artist.

Most famous pieces: The Birth of Venus(Botticelli), Adoration of the Magi (Da Vinci)


By
Unknown
Unknown, Public Domain, Link

My favorites:
Caravaggio’s Medusa, Bronzino’s portraits, the ancient Greek and Roman sculpture


By Caravaggio – Transferred from en.wikipedia. Original uploader was Hugh Manatee at en.wikipedia. Original uploader was Hugh Manatee at en.wikipedia. Later version(s) were uploaded by Ghirlandajo at en.wikipedia. 2005-07-26 (first version); 2006-11-21 (last version), Public Domain, Link

 

 

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My Favorite Artists Through History – Rembrandt

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I love that Rembrandt was unafraid to use heavy shadow in his paintings. The darkness is used strategically to bring the viewer’s eye to the focus. This is the chiaroscuro effect that I am a huge fan of.

His self-portraits are absolutely stunning and it’s really cool to see his evolution through his self-portraits. I am always inspired to start painting self-portraits again whenever I look at this Dutch master.

He wasn’t just a painter. He was also a printmaker! They had a collection of his etchings in Boston a few years back which I was very happy to see! I love his swagger in this one:

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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2014)

I’ve had the pleasure of seeing a lot of Rembrandt work in person in Amsterdam at the Rijksmuseum. I also made sure to go to his house which is maintained as a museum.

My Favorite Pieces: The Night Watch, etchings

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Oxnard, CA – Wildlife Cruise to Anacapa Islands (June 25, 2018)

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dolphins

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sailboat

pelican

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Taken with: Canon EOS Rebel T6 18MP Wi-Fi SLR Digital Camera
2018 Photography:

Oxnard, CA – Wildlife Cruise to Anacapa Islands (June 25, 2018)

JPL – June 10th, 2018

CSUF Graduation 2018

KS Fitness Fight Night – March 3, 2018

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JPL – June 10th, 2018

Had a blast at JPL for their open house. There are few times that I feel that I am out of my intellectual depth, but this was one of them. I will admit that I’ve never been much of a space nerd, maybe because I never saw anything quite like this before. Who knew about all the new planets that are possibly habitable? Sometimes it can be easy to get caught up in all the terrestrial nonsense and take your eyes off the stars.

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TFW You and BAE lookin hot

 

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This is a vintage robot
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This is a new robot 
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Static Electricity!
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Hair standing on end!

Taken with: Canon EOS Rebel T6 18MP Wi-Fi SLR Digital Camera

2018 Photography:

Oxnard, CA – Wildlife Cruise to Anacapa Islands (June 25, 2018)

JPL – June 10th, 2018

CSUF Graduation 2018

KS Fitness Fight Night – March 3, 2018

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Psychic Vampires and Updates

Just and update for you all: it seems very likely that I will not be going to Japan with the JET program. I’m currently on the waitlist, but it seems unlikely that I will be upgraded at this point. It took me a while to be okay with taking the L on this particular dream of mine. While I can apply through other programs to teach in Japan, I’m taking the summer to focus on my writing and other creative pursuits.

I am developing ideas for a short form comic book. I have three stories currently brewing in my mind right now.

In order to actually get this accomplished, I’ve put myself on a social media diet. I’ve deactivated my Facebook account and deleted apps off of my phone. It’s funny how easy it is to get addicted to something so stupid. I’ve been off of it for about a week, and I’ve found that during the time I was mindlessly scrolling through Facebook was when I needed to daydream and be creative.

I will be using this blog more for thoughts and general observations as well as updates regarding my work.

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CSUF Graduation 2018

My little brother graduated from Cal State Fullerton! These are my favorite pictures.

Taken with: Canon EOS Rebel T6 18MP Wi-Fi SLR Digital Camera

2018 Photography:
Oxnard, CA – Wildlife Cruise to Anacapa Islands (June 25, 2018)

JPL – June 10th, 2018

CSUF Graduation 2018

KS Fitness Fight Night – March 3, 2018

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A Tongue for Every Continent

After I studied abroad in Italy for a year (2011 – 2012), I became fascinated with languages. Traveling Europe, I began to see how multilingual people were constantly in the process of learning and mastering other languages. This is incredibly different than the American mentality of monolingualism.

It follows the old joke:

What do you call someone that speaks three languages?

Trilingual.

What do you call someone that speaks two languages?

Bilingual.

What do you call someone that speaks one language?

American.

And of course, as most polyglots know, as soon as you get far enough in your second language, you want to learn more and more languages. I guess I am no different:

Which language(s) are you learning – why those?

Japanese

I am in the process of learning Japanese as I have applied to go through the JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching) Program. I am hoping to be able to survive, hold a decent conversation with Japanese people, and immerse myself once I go over to Japan. I’ve loved Japan since I was young watching Sailor Moon and DragonBall Z.

Italian

I studied Italian for two semesters before I left to live in Italy for 11 months where I studied at the Fine Arts Academy in Florence through the CSU International Programs. Much of my knowledge of Italian vocabulary focuses on art terms or cooking terms. While Italian is on the backburner, I do love to read Italian memes and watch videos on Italian cooking taught by old Italian cooks.

 Arabic

During my Master’s program, I was considering where I wanted to go abroad. While I was in Italy, the Arab Spring brought a lot of people from different countries to Italy so I met many Arabic people that I thought were very friendly. During my second to last semester in grad school, I decided to take Arabic 101. Man! What a difficult language! But I love the way Arabic looks and its potential for beautiful calligraphy. I am definitely interested in visiting either Morocco, Egypt or Jordan someday.

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にほんごです。

As promised, I am using this blog to also document my Japanese learning.

Right now , I am learning time expressions.

Here are some sentences (that are probably wrong, but I will edit my post later to correct):

わたしはまいばんじゆういちじねます。

わたしはまいにちしごとにきます。

わたしはしやうまつえいがへいきます。

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JET Program and Learning Japanese

I applied for the JET Program (Japan Exchange and Teaching) in November, and interviewed early February. I won’t hear the results until late March/early April.

Currently, I’m in a Japanese 101 class (again). This is much different than the time I was learning Italian before I went to Italy. Now I am much more experienced in language and the language of language.

I will be using this blog to post more about my language learning experiences, as well as posting more photos from this year.