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Job Hunting Advice for New Teachers

I have mentored many people who are just about to graduate college or are lost about getting into the job market. Many people ask to pick my brain about what to do in an interview or have me look over their cover letters or resumes. Here’s another new blog series especially for aspiring teachers or teachers looking for new jobs.

Before you start searching:

If you are still in school:

  • Start networking with your professors and volunteering to help with club duties/activities/research projects etc. Professors with clout will remember you if other companies ask about new graduates looking for work.
  • Interning is good experience, but often does not lead to employment (in my experience). Don’t put all your eggs into this basket.

Create a Generic Resume: (This could be its own section, tbh)

  • Resumes should be 1 page, easy to read, with your most relevant and recent experience at the top of the page. There are hundreds of ways to create resumes.
  • CVs (or Curriculum Vitae) are your “life’s work.” A CV is allowed to be long. This might be helpful for those that may just be fresh out of school.
  • Use action verbs to describe what you did in each job/experience/project and keep it short
  • Use this to populate your LinkedIn Profile

Online Presence:

  • Have an online presence and make sure you look employable. Jump on Facebook or Linkedin or Instagram (especially if you are in the visual arts)
  • Google search yourself. Employers can and will google search you so be ready and scrub your social media accounts so they are squeaky clean. Immediately untag or take down any pictures of you that make you look unreliable(a drunk/druggie/etc), mean(racist/sexist/etc), or lazy.

Finding a Job:

Use your “weak ties” or social network

  • This is 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon for employment. If you are a hard worker, nice, and competent, someone will recommend you to their friend of a friend. Put out the word on facebook or whatever social media account you use.
  • Start talking and mentioning your job search to everyone you know and ask them to tell you about any job they might come across. Many heads are better than one. Put your search out into your network and some job leads may come back to you.

Job search Engines

  • Use generic job search engines: indeed.com, monster.com, craigslist.com
  • Find job-specific search engines in your field. For example, if you want to work in higher education in the USA, the best job search engine is higheredjobs.com, but if you want to work in community colleges in California you would want the cccregistry.org. Same with the tech field I believe the site is dice.com for tech jobs.
  • Usually there is a way to subscribe to job searches so they will send an email if anything comes up.

Googling Companies you want to work for

  • Go to the company website you want to work for. Look for “Careers” or “Employment” or “Work for Us” something like that and try to find open positions. Apply for any open positions you like.
  • Failing that, find the company directory, try to find the person who may be likely to hire you. Call or send them an email inquiring about employment or the application process and if there are any open positions available.

Hit the road!

  • Start looking for “Hiring Now” signs in the windows of places. Keep an eye out, and hopefully you have a bunch of your friends looking out too.
  • Large companies will usually hire you through websites, so even if you meet the hiring manager in person, they will send you to a computer.
  • Smaller companies/business may have you submit an application in person, or have you email a resume.
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One thought on “Job Hunting Advice for New Teachers

  1. […] Part I: Job Hunting Advice for New Teachers […]

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