Jane Eyre (1996)


This movie is my favorite adaptation of my favorite novel.  For those unfamiliar with the novel, it is written by one of the Bronte sisters (basically the Gothic cousins of Jane Austen). It is set in the 1800s in England, where poor little orphan Jane Eyre is just trying to make her way in a world that wants to crush her willful, wild spirit. After her family dies of a terrible disease she goes to live with her aunt and her children and they all are absolutely terrible to her and mistreat her.  So they send her off to boarding school, namely, an extremely hard-nosed, straight-laced boarding school with a penchant for telling little girls they are going to roast in hell for minor character flaws. Jane Eyre survives 10 years in this place and seeks out employment at the mysterious Mr. Rochester’s mansion to be a governess to an adorable little girl named Adele. Jane Eyre begins to develop feelings for the very dark and brooding Mr. Rochester and of course he has a dark secret hidden away.

This adaptation is my favorite mainly because of the casting. The young Jane Eyre is played by a young Anna Paquin, and she definitely captures the young punk attitude of the young and wild Jane Eyre before she has to keep her feelings bottled up inside herself. Jane Eyre is never described as beautiful in the book, she is described as plain and almost bird like. Neither is Mr. Rochester described as handsome.  I thought William Hurt did an excellent job of portraying him.

The script is wonderful and includes the important parts in the beginning of Jane’s life that are very important to understanding her character. Other film adaptations skip over her childhood trauma to get to the romance parts. While I liked the 2011 adaptation, the actors were too beautiful (looking at you, Fassbender) and blonde (?!) and so it was hard to see that Jane felt ugly and unwanted as opposed to the 1996 version, with the beautiful mirror shots in several parts of the movie. The 2011 adaptation definitely highlighted the gothic/horror elements of the novel, which I do wish was more in the 1996 version.

Ultimately, though, the 1996 adaptation of Jane Eyre is my favorite! I recommend everyone to watch it if you’re into tortured souls trying to find love despite circumstances and their duty obligations.

Author: Marissa

I am an artist, a writer, and globetrotter. Trained as a traditional fine artist, I am now exploring the digital arts with a great interest in sequential arts and storytelling.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s